About Identifying GUI Objects - WinRunner

When you work in Context Sensitive mode, you can test your application as the user sees it—in terms of GUI objects—such as windows, menus, buttons, and lists. Each object has a defined set of properties that determines its behavior and appearance. WinRunner learns these properties and uses them to identify and locate GUI objects during a test run. Note that in Context Sensitive mode, WinRunner does not need to know the physical location of a GUI object to identify it.

You can use the GUI Spy to view the properties of any GUI object on your desktop, to see how WinRunner identifies it. For additional information on viewing the properties of GUI objects and teaching them to WinRunner, see “Understanding Basic GUI Map Concepts.”

WinRunner stores the information it learns in a GUI map. When WinRunner runs a test, it uses the GUI map to locate objects: It reads an object’s description in the GUI map and then looks for an object with the same properties in the application being tested. You can view the GUI map in order to gain a comprehensive picture of the objects in your application.

The GUI map is actually the sum of one or more GUI map files. There are two modes for organizing GUI map files:

  • You can create a GUI map file for your entire application, or for each window in your application. Multiple tests can reference a common GUI map file. This is the default mode in WinRunner. For experienced WinRunner users, this is the most efficient way to work. For more information about working in the Global GUI Map File mode, see “Working in the Global GUI Map File Mode.”
  • WinRunner can automatically create a GUI map file for each test you create. You do not need to worry about creating, saving, and loading GUI map files. If you are new to WinRunner, this is the simplest way to work. For more information about working in the GUI Map File per Test mode, see “Working in the GUI Map File per Test Mode.”

At any stage in the testing process, you can switch from the GUI Map File per Test mode to the Global GUI Map File mode. For additional information, see, “Merging GUI Map Files.”

As the user interface of your application changes, you can continue to use tests you developed previously. You simply add, delete, or edit object descriptions in the GUI map so that WinRunner can continue to find the objects in your modified application. For more information, see, “Editing the GUI Map.”

You can specify which properties WinRunner uses to identify a specific class of object. You can also teach WinRunner to identify custom objects, and to map these objects to a standard class of objects. For additional information, see, “Configuring the GUI Map.”

You can also teach WinRunner to recognize any bitmap in a window as a GUI object by defining the bitmap as a virtual object. For additional information, see “Learning Virtual Objects.”


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