Organizational Object SAP HR

Definition:

Objects that are used to create an organizational plan in Organizational Management. The following object types are available:

  • Organizational Unit
  • Position
  • Job
  • Work Center
  • Task

Organizational plans can also include organizational objects that come from components other than Organizational Management (cost center or person (employee or R/3 user), for example) or objects defined in customizing.

Use:

You can relate organizational objects in two ways to create an organizational plan:

  • you can either relate objects of the same object type in separate hierarchies or list them in separate catalogs.
  • or
  • you can relate objects of different object types and in so doing relate the hierarchies and catalogs.

These relationships enable you to depict multi-dimensional dependency in your enterprise’s organizational plan. It is not mandatory to use all of these objects in your plan. You do not have to define work centers, for example, if you do not find them applicable. You do not have to assign tasks to your jobs and positions. You must, however, create organizational units. By determining a validity period for every organizational object, you can display and evaluate situations in the past, present and future.

Structure:

An organizational object comprises:

  • a short and long description
  • an 8 digit ID number and a description
  • a relationship, which defines the link between the object and other objects
  • various object characteristics
  • a validity period and a time constraint
  • a status indicator

Organizational units:

Definition:

Organizational object (object key O) used to form the basis of an organizational plan. Organizational units are functional units in an enterprise. According to how tasks are divided up within an enterprise, these can be departments, groups or project teams, for example. Organizational units differ from other units in an enterprise such as personnel areas, company codes, business areas etc. These are used to depict structures (administration or accounting) in the corresponding components.

Use:

By depicting your organizational units and the hierarchical or matrix relationships between them, you model the organizational structure of your enterprise. This organizational structure is the basis for the creation of an organizational plan, as every position in your enterprise is assigned to an organizational unit. This defines the reporting structure.

Integration:

An organizational unit can be related, amongst other things, to:

  • other organizational units via relationship A/B 002 (reports to / is line manager of).
  • positions via relationship A/B 003 (belongs to / includes) and A/B 012 (manages / is managed by).
  • tasks via relationship A/B 007 (describes / is described by)
  • a master cost center via relationship A 011 (cost center assignment) or with several cost centers via relationship A 014 (cost center distribution) The organizational units do not have to have their own cost centers.

You determine the characteristics of an organizational unit using the following infotypes:

Object (infotype 1000)
Relationships (infotype 1001)
Description (infotype 1002)
Department/Staff (infotype 1003)
About the Account Assignment Features Infotype (1008)
Work Schedule (infotype 1011)
Cost Planning (infotype 1015)
Standard Profiles (infotype 1016)
PD Profiles (infotype 1017)
Cost Distribution (infotype 1018)
Required Positions (infotype 1019)
Site Dependent Info (infotype 1027)
Address (infotype 1028)
Mail Address (infotype 1032)
Sales Area (infotype 1037) [Ext.]
Shift Group (infotype 1039)
SAP Organizational Object (infotype 1208)

Positions:

Definition:

Organizational object (object key S) used to distribute tasks to different positions and to depict the reporting structure in your organizational plan. Positions are concrete and are held by employees or R/3 users in an enterprise, sales administrator, head of European sales or secretary in the marketing department, for example.

Positions differ from jobs. A job is not concrete but rather the basis for the creation of various positions with similar tasks and characteristics.

A position does not only inherit its tasks and characteristics from a job. It can also be assigned tasks and characteristics directly or inherit them from the organizational unit that it belongs to.

Use:

You assign positions to organizational units, in doing this, you also determine the tasks assigned to them. You can define a chief position within an organizational unit, to which all other positions in the organizational unit report.In some enterprises, by assigning positions to organizational units, you define the reporting structure, that is the assignment of positions to one another.

If the actual reporting structure of your enterprise differs from the reporting structure according to the organizational structure, you can model it in two ways:

  • as a reporting structure, if your positions are assigned in a one dimensional hierarchy
  • as a matrix organization, if your positions report to more than one organizational unit Matrix relationships can be disciplinary or professional. In doing this, you relate the positions concerned to each other, regardless of which organizational unit they are assigned to. You need positions to:
  • create staff assignments, that is the assignment of holders (employees or R/3 users) to positions and to a corresponding organizational unit
  • distribute tasks between positions in your enterprise
  • use Workflow Management
  • evaluate your reporting structure

You can depict and document the reporting structure of your enterprise using reports. The reporting structure you create determines the evaluation paths available to you.

Integration:

A position must always be related to:

  • an organizational unit via relationship A/B 003 (belongs to / includes)
  • a job via relationship A/B 007 (describes / is described by)
  • A position can also be related to:
  • an organizational unit via relationship A 012 (reports to)
  • another position via relationship A/B 002 (reports to/ is line manager of) or A/B 004 (is subordinate to (disc.) / supervises) or A/B 005 (is subordinate to / is line manager of)
  • a holder (one or more persons or R/3 users) via relationship A/B 008 (holder)
  • tasks via relationship A/B 007 (describes / is described by)
  • a work center via relationship A/B 003 (belongs to / includes)
  • a master cost center via relationship A 011 (cost center assignment) or with several cost centers via relationship A 014 (cost center distribution) You determine the characteristics of a position using the following infotypes:

Object (infotype 1000)
Relationships (infotype 1001)
Description (infotype 1002)
Department/Staff (infotype 1003)
Planned Remuneration (infotype 1005) [Ext.]
Vacancy (infotype 1007)
About the Account Assignment Features Infotype (1008)
Authorities and Resources (infotype 1010)
Work Schedule (infotype 1011)
Employee Group/Subgroup (infotype 1013)
Obsolete (infotype 1014)
Cost Planning (infotype 1015)
Standard Profiles (infotype 1016)
PD Profiles (infotype 1017)
Cost Distribution (infotype 1018)
Address (infotype 1028)
Mail Address (infotype 1032)
Job Evaluation Results (infotype 1050) [Ext.]
Survey Results (infotype 1051) [Ext.]
SAP Organizational Object (infotype 1208)

To use Personnel Cost Planning effectively, you must update the Vacancy infotype (1007) for positions. You must also maintain the Cost Planning infotype (1015) for either the position, or the describing job.

Job:

Definition:

Organizational object (object key C) used to create positions in an organizational plan. Positions are concrete and can are held by persons in an enterprise (secretary in the marketing department, for example). Jobs, in contrast, are classifications of functions in an enterprise (secretary, for example), which are defined by the assignment of tasks and characteristics. Jobs serve as job descriptions, that apply to several positions with similar tasks or characteristics.

Use:

When you create jobs, they are listed in a job index.When you create a new position (secretary in the marketing department, for example), you can relate it to a job that already exists in your job index (secretary, for example). The position then automatically inherits the tasks and characteristics of the job.If there is no corresponding job, add one to your job index and assign it tasks and characteristics. This will then be available when you add new positions.

This relationship will make it easier for you to create positions that are similar or the same, as you will not have to assign tasks and characteristics to each individual position. You can also assign additional tasks and characteristics directly to positions.You have 20 secretaries in your enterprise. Each one holds a position (secretary in the marketing department, for example). This position is described by the job secretary and the tasks and characteristics that belong to it. In addition to this, each position (secretary in the marketing department, for example) can be assigned specific tasks and characteristics, which differentiate it from other positions (secretary in the personnel department, for example).Jobs can also provide a valuable point of reference for developing qualifications, if you plan to install the Personnel Development component of HR.

Integration:

A job can be related, amongst other things, to:

  • a position via relationship A/B 007 (describes / is described by)
  • tasks via relationship A/B 007 (describes / is described by)
  • a holder of a position via relationship A/B 017 (is performed by / performs)
  • You can then assign a position holder directly to a job, if a different job applies to him or her than the one which his or her position is assigned to.
  • another job via relationship A/B 041 (is the same as)

You determine the characteristics of an job using the following infotypes: Object

Relationship
Description
Planned Remuneration
Cost Planning
Standard Profiles
PD Profiles
Job Evaluation Results
Survey Results

Work centers:

Definition:

Organizational object (object key A) used to depict work centers that exist in your enterprise in your organizational plan. A work center identifies the physical location where work is carried out. A work center can be defined by a general place description (Philadelphia, for example) or a very specific place description (office 105, desk III, for example).

Use:

When you create a work center, you create a work center index for your enterprise. The work centers listed here can then be assigned to other organizational units, positions, for example. You can assign characteristics to work centers. You can identify any restrictions associated with the work center –perhaps an area of a plant may be unsuitable for employees with disabilities. Using the health examinations infotype (1009), you can determine whether a work center will be subject to regular health examinations.

Integration:

A work center can be related, amongst other things, to:

  • a position (or more than one position) via relationship A/B 003 (belongs to / includes)
  • another work center via relationship A/B 003 (belongs to / includes) You determine the characteristics of a work center using the following infotypes:

Object
Relationships
Description
Planned Remuneration
Restrictions
Health Examinations
Authorities and Resources
Work Schedule
Employee Group/Subgroup
Obsolete
Cost Planning
Cost Distribution
Address
Mail Address
Shift Group

Tasks:

Definition

Tasks are one of the key objects in the system. They are useful cross-application means of carrying information and as such, provide a powerful tool for managing the flow of data and information through the system.

Use:

Types of Tasks:

Types of Tasks

The use of these tasks differs, depending on the area of the system you are working in:

  • If you are working with the Human Resources component, you use tasks and standard tasks
  • If you are working with SAP Business Workflow, you use the following tasks:
  • Normal tasks
  • Standard tasks
  • Workflow tasks
  • Workflow templates

For human resources purposes, tasks are individual duties and responsibilities that are carried out by employees. The following activities are examples of tasks:

  • Answering the telephone
  • Producing marketing material
  • Assessing applicants
  • Developing software

You can use tasks for the following purposes:

  • To describe jobs and positions
  • For job and position descriptions, create tasks and create relationships between the tasks, and jobs and positions, using the Relationship infotype (1001).

  • As a point of reference for developing qualifications, if you plan to use the Personnel Development component.

It is not mandatory to create tasks. Once you have created tasks, you can use various infotypes to define their different attributes. You may create an unlimited number of tasks. You can create single tasks, or task groups. Single tasks are individual activities, creating the department budget, assessing new equipment; task groups define activities that are usually performed together.

You can create a task group with the name Secretarial tasks. This group contains the following single tasks:

  • Word processing
  • Answering the telephone
  • Filing

Task groups are advantageous since they save you time when you create relationships between jobs and positions. It is faster to create a relationship with one task group, than with several single tasks. You can build a task group by creating relationships between the single tasks involved.

All tasks that exist at a certain time are listed in a task catalog. The task catalog also shows the relationships among different tasks, if task groups have been defined.

Task Profiles

A task profile is a list of separate tasks assigned to a specific object. The list of tasks defines the purpose, the role, and the actions of an object in the system. The system uses task profiles differently, depending on the application area:

  • In Organizational Management, task profiles serve as highly detailed job and position descriptions
  • In SAP Business Workflow, task profiles determine the tasks that a user can perform in the system
  • In SAP Session Manager, task profiles determine the areas of the system a user sees when logging on.

There are different types of task. The content of the task profile varies according to the type of task:

  • If you are working with the Human Resources component, task profiles include normal tasks (referred to as customer-defined tasks) and standard tasks.
  • If you are working with SAP Business Workflow or SAP Session Manager, your task profile may contain the following tasks:
    • Normal tasks
    • Standard tasks
    • Workflow tasks
    • Workflow templates

In addition, task profiles developed for SAP Business Workflow or SAP Session Manager can include roles. If you include a task in a task profile, and that task is part of a role, the entire role is included in the task profile.

You can create and maintain task profiles for the following objects:

  • Organizational units
  • Positions
  • Jobs
  • Work centers
  • Users

How you set up task profiles varies according to the method you use to maintain your organizational plan.

Integration:

You can edit the following infotypes for tasks:

Object (1000)
Relationship (1001)
Character (1004)
Standard Profiles (1016)
PD Profiles (1017)
If you are working with SAP Business Workflow, you can edit additional infotypes: See SAP Business Workflow [Ext.]

Holder:

Definition:

A person (object type key P) or R/3 user (object type key US) who is listed as an employee in Personnel Administration, who is assigned to a position or a work center in an organizational plan.

Use:

By assigning a holder to a position , you determine,

  • where a person (employee) is functionally assigned in your enterprise
  • which tasks are assigned to an employee
  • who (employees or R/3 users) tasks are to be forwarded tasks in a workflow.

By assigning a holder to a work center , you specify where in your enterprise an employee or R/3 user works. By assigning a person (employee) to a position, you implement integration between Organizational Management and Personnel Administration, as long as it is set up in Customizing.

Integration:

The following relationships are relevant to a holder:

  • A person or R/3 user becomes a holder, if he or she is related to a position via relationship A/B 008 (holder).
  • You can assign a position holder to a job directly via relationship A/B 017 (is carried out by/ carries out), if another job is to apply to them other than the one which his or her position is assigned to.

Cost Center:

Definition:

External object (object type K) from Controlling which represents a clear origin of costs.

Use:

By assigning cost centers to organizational objects, you determine where costs incurred by the object are to be charged. The inheritance principle applies: If an organizational object is not assigned a cost center, the cost center assigned to the superior object applies. An organizational object may also be assigned more than one cost center.

Integration:

A cost center can be related to the following organizational objects:

  • an organizational unit via relationship A 011 (Cost center assignment)
  • a position via relationship A 011 (Cost center assignment)
  • a work center via relationship A 011 (Cost center assignment)

All rights reserved © 2018 Wisdom IT Services India Pvt. Ltd DMCA.com Protection Status

SAP HR Topics