Mobile Plant Operator Interview Questions & Answers

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Mobile Plant Operator Interview Questions & Answers

Are you looking for a technical job then Mobile Plant operator is the correct choice. Just check in wisdom jobs which unveils the opportunities for talented people. Now a day’s mobile is handy to everyone. Mobile companies are investing more new products. They are looking for dynamic persons who will carry the technical skills among them. Persons should who should handle the work along with the team then Mobile Plant operator jobs are the right choice. Find latest mobile plant operator job interview questions and answers page to attend the interview with great confidence. Interviewers were seeking for talented persons who will put their efforts in work. Mobile manufacturers are ready to give their best for skilled persons who will work hard. Interested candidates must grab this opportunity and step in for an interview with confidence.

Mobile Plant Operator Interview Questions

Mobile Plant Operator Interview Questions
    1. Question 1. How Close Can Mobile Plant Work To Power Lines?

      Answer :

      This can vary depending on the power line and all operators must be aware of the power line's Danger Zone. 

      • A live insulated overhead power line or aerial bundled conductor line of a voltage of no more than 1,000v
        Danger Zone = Within 0.5m
      • A live uninsulated overhead power line of a voltage of no more than 1,000v                                      
        Danger Zone = Within 1.0m
      • A live overhead power line, whether insulated or not, of a voltage exceeding 1,000v but no more than 33,000v            
        Danger Zone = Within 3.0m 
      • A live overhead power line, whether insulated or not, of a voltage exceeding 33,000v          
        Danger Zone = Within 6.0m 

      Working within these Danger Zones should only be done if the power lines have been insulated and all necessary safety precautions are taken to ensure the safety of all workers on site. 

    2. Question 2. Do I Have To Use The Seat Belt When Operating Mobile Plant?

      Answer :

      Yes, the operator and any passengers must wear the seat belts which have been fitted to the mobile plant. Everyone inside or on the plant should be seated and strapped in throughout the duration of works and any other movement.

    3. Question 3. Do We Need To Fit Reversing Alarms To Mobile Plant?

      Answer :

      A suitable control measure to avoid hitting or running over any onsite workers and all other pedestrians would be to fit a reversing alarm to all mobile plant. Either a reversing alarm or flashing light should be fitted to plant in order to warn pedestrians of reversing plant. 

    4. Question 4. Does Mobile Plant Need To Be Fitted With Roll-over Protective Structure (rops)?

      Answer :

      If the plant is presented with any risk of overturning, then plant must be fitted with ROPS, restraining devices and seat belts. Factors which increase the risk of overturning plant are:

      • Slopping terrains
      • Rough, Slick or muddy surfaces
      • Towing or pulling objects 
      • Operating near holes, ditches or embankments 

    5. Question 5. When Does Mobile Plant Need To Be Fitted With A Falling Objects Structure (fops)?

      Answer :

      If the mobile plant is working in conditions which present the risk of falling objects, then the plant should be designed and fitted with a falling objects protective structure as well as seat belts.

    6. Question 6. How Can I Prevent Mobile Plant From Running Over Pedestrians?

      Answer :

      This is of high priority, the risk involved with mobile plant and pedestrians can become a problem if not adequately planned for and controlled. Methods of controlling this risk are:

      • Separating pedestrians from where plant is operating 
      • Traffic management that controls the movement of plant and pedestrians 
      • Communication systems between plant operators and pedestrians 
      • Spotters can be used to control traffic in localised areas 
      • Personal protective equipment such as high visibility vests 

      Operating mobile plant comes with numerous risk and factors to consider to make sure you're in control and avoid any potential for hazards. Getting your plant on site can be difficult if you haven't covered all your bases. Knowing the answers to these questions is a step in the right direction, as reducing risk will help you maintain your reputation as well as avoid the repurcussions of serious incidents. To further improve the compliance of your plant, we've created a checklist to help increase the chances of your plant being approved for onsite use.

    7. Question 7. What License Do I Need To Operate Mobile Plant In The Workplace?

      Answer :

      There are no government issued licenses for vehicles at work; the law requires that each operator is given adequate training by their employer so that they are competent to operate the machinery which they use.

    8. Question 8. I Work For A Company Which Runs Its Own In House Training Which Is Not Accredited By Any Scheme. Is This Legal?

      Answer :

      As long as the training you are given means that you are competent to operate the machinery you use safely, then there is no absolute legal duty to use the accredited system.

    9. Question 9. I Operate Plant & Lift Trucks, What Is The Licensing System For That?

      Answer :

      There is a legal duty for every employer to ensure that their employers are adequately trained for the machinery they operate, there are many different schemes in operation, each employer should satisfy themselves that training under the schemes they accept means that operators are competent to use each piece of equipment that they will be required to operate.

    10. Question 10. My Employer Will Not Accept My Training Certificate Or Card As Valid, And Is Insisting That I Retrain To A Different Scheme. Is This Legal?

      Answer :

      Employers are entitled to require their plant operators to be trained to any scheme which they think is appropriate to their workplace, as long as completion of the training certificate the company chooses means that employees are competent to operate the mobile plant they will be using.

    11. Question 11. Do I Need A Valid Uk Car Driving License In Order To Operate Plant In The Workplace?

      Answer :

      No, driving a car and operating mobile plant are very different tasks, although they use some of the same skills. There is no legal requirement for plant operators to hold a road driving license unless they wish to drive their vehicles on the public highway. All plant driven on the public highway must comply with the appropriate road traffic legislation.

    12. Question 12. It Is Over Three Years Since I Did My Plant Training. My Employer Has Refused To Send Me On Refresher Training. Is He Obliged To Provide Additional Training?

      Answer :

      There is no specific requirement to provide refresher training after set intervals, but even trained and experienced operators need to be reassessed from time to time to ensure that they continue to operate machines safely. In addition to routine safety monitoring, re-assessment might be appropriate where operators have not used machines for some time, are occasional users, appear to have developed unsafe working practices, have had an accident or near miss, or there is a change in their working practices or environment.

    13. Question 13. I Have Never Had Any Formal Training To Drive A Machine. What Are The Legal Requirements?

      Answer :

      Your employer has a duty under Health and Safety legislation to provide information, instruction, training and supervision to ensure the health and safety of their employees. Under the work equipment regulations employers are required to “ensure that all persons who use work equipment have received adequate training for purposes of health and safety, including training in the methods which may be adopted when using the work equipment, any risks which such use may entail and precautions to be taken.” By not providing you with any training at all, your employer could be breaking the law.

    14. Question 14. What Are The Key Facts Mobile Plant Operators?

      Answer :

      • Drivers and mobile plant operators drive and tend trains and motor vehicles; drive, operate and monitor industrial and agricultural machinery and equipment; or execute deck duties on board ships and other water-borne crafts.
      • The five key skills for drivers and mobile plant operators are problem solving, job-specific skills, teamwork, communication and learning.
      • There is a strong gender imbalance in the workforce, in favour of male employees.
      • The occupational group faces fairly widespread recruitment difficulties, due to hardships of the nature of jobs, regarding working hours worked and pay levels.
      • The number of drivers and mobile plant operators employed across the EU-28 remained stable over the past decade; by 2025, a small decline (about 5%) is foreseen.
      • They are a shortage occupation in three EU Member States; seven EU countries report them as a surplus occupation.

    15. Question 15. Who Are Mobile Plant Operators?

      Answer :

      Drivers and mobile plant operators drive and tend trains and motor vehicles; drive, operate and monitor industrial and agricultural machinery and equipment; or execute deck duties on board ships and other water-borne crafts. The main subgroups are: locomotive engine drivers and related workers; car, van and motorcycle drivers; heavy truck and bus drivers; mobile plant operators; and ships' deck crews and related workers.

      There is a strong gender imbalance in the workforce, in favour of male employees. The occupational group faces fairly widespread recruitment difficulties, due to hardships of the nature of jobs, regarding working hours worked and pay levels (for example, heavy truck and bus drivers).

    16. Question 16. What Skills Do Mobile Plant Operators Need?

      Answer :

      According to Cedefop’s European skills and jobs survey (ESJS), the key skills for drivers and mobile plant operators are problem solving, job-specific skills, teamwork, communication and learning. These skills could support employees in this occupation to also tackle anticipated future skill challenges.

      In addition to that, drivers for professional bus, truck and taxis need to hold specific qualifications and/or permissions from local/national authorities to exercise the profession. For example, to become a professional truck, bus and coach driver one needs to have the Driver Certificate of Professional Competence (CPC), a professional driving qualification.

    17. Question 17. Where Are Mobile Plant Operators Mostly In Demand?

      Answer :

      The labour market dynamics for this occupation differ across EU Member States:

      According to Cedefop, drivers and mobile plant operators are highly demanded (i.e. they are in shortage) in Croatia, Lithuania and Hungary; however a surplus of them has been reported in Ireland, Spain, Italy, Cyprus, Austria, Slovenia and the United Kingdom.

    18. Question 18. What Are The Trends For The Future?

      Answer :

      The number of drivers and mobile plant operators employed across the EU-28 remained stable over the past decade; by 2025, a small decline (about 5%) is foreseen. However, job openings will be available, but only due to the high replacement demand.

      Drivers and mobile plant operators are traditionally medium-level qualified, as about two thirds of them will be between 2015 and 2025. The most significant trend in the next decade will be the replacement of low qualified workers with high qualified ones, as the latter will account for about 10% of the occupation, compared to 6% in 2005-2015.

      Although employment in land transport will shrink by around 9%, two fifths of these workers will still be working in the sector by 2025, sustaining its place as the main employer of this occupation. Employment is expected to decrease in 2015-2025 in all big employers-sectors: about one in eight drivers and plant operators will be working in wholesale and retail (12% decrease); while warehousing and postal services and construction will employ about 8% each, with demand been down by 8% as well, compared to 2015. 3.5% of workers in this occupation will work in agriculture that will experience the highest decrease in employment levels (20%). Worth-mentioning increase is expected only in sectors with small representation of the occupation (around 2% of the workforce), such as accommodation and catering where drivers will almost double; and health (about 8% increase).

    19. Question 19. Which Drivers Of Change Will Affect Their Skills?

      Answer :

      Drivers and mobile plant operators are a homogeneous group, differentiated mainly by the vehicle they use (such as vehicles for road transport, trains, industrial, agricultural or ship machinery). Rapid technological, societal and economic changes are expected to affect the nature of their job tasks, and therefore the skills needed.

      Advances in technology, in terms of new tools and software and automation/robots will affect all sub-occupations in this group from different angles:

      • plant operators and those handling machines (such as drivers working in warehousing, forestry or construction) will increasingly be challenged by more advanced/computer-controlled machines and vehicles. Knowledge of and familiarity with new technologies and advanced machines will be critical, as automation increasingly infiltrates warehousing.
      • Technological advancements in land transport have already affected commercial transportation; for example, taxi drivers have adopted GPS devices and mobile applications that improve the client’s experience. Automation of vehicles (e.g. railway brake, signal and switch operators) have already limited the role of some drivers. Although they are still at planning phase, automated/self-driving cars are expected to flourish in the next decade, substantially changing the skills profile of taxi and other commercial vehicles drivers.

      However, more developments are underway, expected to revolutionise transport and mobility: the ‘platooning in mobility’ will change the role of drivers. Truck platooning regards “a number of trucks equipped with state-of-the-art driving support systems – one closely following the other. This forms a platoon with the trucks driven by smart technology, and mutually communicating.” Platooning is expected to improve traffic safety, regulate traffic flows, and reduce fuel consumption through constant speed cruise. Truck drivers will therefore need new skills in engineering and IT to be able to drive these “smart trucks”.

      • The strong rise in demand for environmentally sustainable mobility will emphasize the importance of green skills. Implications for the role of drivers and mobile plant operators can be expected both in terms of the type of vehicles/machines they use and how efficiently they use them. For example, commercial vehicle drivers are now required to monitor their driving skills and drive more efficiently. Environmental considerations also influence trends in employment. The demand for bus and train drivers could increase as a consequence of efforts to promote and encourage the use of public transport to lower emissions.

    20. Question 20. How Can These Skill Needs Be Met?

      Answer :

      Most drivers and mobile plant operator’s work in sectors where new business models are being shaped due to technological change, focus on environmental challenges and regulation. Due to these new paradigms, job tasks will increasingly depend on more ICT-based and specialised equipment and products, especially for those working in the land transport sector. Future jobs will therefore require new and more advanced skills in engineering and ICT, as well as understanding and handling of specific software and basic understanding of new technological advancements such as automated cars and platooning.

      Simultaneously, the growing interdisciplinary elements of transport activities (such as combining new technological tools with safety rules) will also require these professionals to develop or adjust their skills to safety rules in a more automated workplace. An update of outdated ICT and sector-specific technology knowledge is therefore necessary, especially targeting older workers. Drivers also require good numeracy skills for cash handling, machine operation, time management, and processing information and data.

      Despite automation, team working, customer service and interpersonal skills will continue to be integral to all jobs, especially for those working in warehouses, plants, construction sites etc. Foreign language capacities will also be important for constructing a more competitive skill profile in a globalised market. Training plant operators to new machines or software should also consistently cover safety issues that will continue to be relevant even in more automated workspaces, to minimise accident risks and ensure compliance to local or EU regulations.

      Notably, some of plant operators’ job tasks are particularly vulnerable to replacement by automation. Skills will follow tasks in shifting significantly to ‘smart’ machine handling, programming and maintaining. Increased complexity in warehousing/logistics jobs will increase the demand for high qualifications and strong(er) technical, engineering, mathematical skills. Dedicated and recurring training could satisfy these skill needs.

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